Last week, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) announced a new Response Action Outcome (RAO) Notice, which allows Licensed Site Remediation Professionals (LSRPs) to issue an RAO for a site with contaminated sediment that migrated from an off-site source.  The new notice, entitled “Sediment Contamination From an Off-Site Source Not Remediated – General,” is the most recent addition to the growing list of RAO notices.

The notice can be used after a Preliminary Assessment and Site Investigation (PA/SI) confirms that the source of the sediment contamination is off-site and not related to the site being evaluated.  The off-site source must be reported to NJDEP and the resultant new incident number included in the Notice.  Furthermore, the LSRP can identify an existing NJDEP case if it is known to be the off-site source and is currently undergoing investigation or remediation.

Given that it is well-established law that you are not responsible for contamination coming from offsite, the primary purpose of this action appears to be to streamline the RAO process.  So, this is another tool in the LSRP toolbox for the often complicated sediment cases, which continue to garner regulator’s attention here in New Jersey and nationwide.

Read more on sediment contamination in these discussions:

JOIN THE CLUB: EPA Sizing Up Hackensack River for Superfund Listing

WE ARE JUST GETTING STARTED: EPA Issues Much Anticipated Cleanup Plan for the Lower 8.3 Miles of the Lower Passaic River

 

The Supreme Court on Monday dealt a setback to the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulation limiting mercury and other toxic emissions from power plants – the “mercury rule.” In Michigan v. Environmental Protection Agency, the Court held that EPA acted unreasonably by making its initial decision to regulate plant emissions without considering the cost of regulation. Although the ruling interrupted the Court’s much-publicized string of “liberal” rulings, in the end the decision may have more impact on the way EPA makes regulations than on whether EPA ultimately regulates emission of mercury and other pollutants from power plants.

The Clean Air Act directs EPA to study and decide whether it is “appropriate and necessary” to regulate power plant emissions. In 2000, EPA concluded that mercury and other toxic emissions from power plants pose a danger to human health and the environment and that regulation of power plants was therefore “appropriate and necessary.” In 2012, after years of further study, rule-making, and litigation, EPA issued its mercury rule. EPA considered costs of compliance in developing the regulations but not in deciding whether to regulate in the first place.

The Supreme Court disagreed with this process. In a 5-to-4 decision, Justice Scalia’s opinion for the majority interpreted the statutory term “appropriate” to require EPA to consider all pertinent factors, including the cost of regulation, in deciding whether to regulate at all. In the Court’s view, EPA’s consideration of cost in fashioning the regulations came too late in the process. The Court therefore held that the power plant regulations were improperly issued.

Justice Kagan’s opinion for the four dissenters agreed with the majority that EPA had to consider cost of any proposed regulations at some time in its rule-making process. But she disagreed that EPA had to do so in deciding whether to regulate power plant emissions in the first place. She argued that EPA reasonably determined that regulation was appropriate based on the finding that exposure to airborne mercury causes extensive health concerns and that EPA could properly consider costs in determining how to regulate, rather than whether to regulate.

The decision in Michigan v. EPA was a loss for environmental advocacy groups that supported the regulation, but it is a narrow ruling, hinging on the meaning of “appropriate.” EPA will have to re-review its decision to regulate emissions from plants and take costs into account, but the Court’s decision does not suggest that cost considerations will ultimately scuttle the mercury rule itself. In fact, industry had already begun to plan operations and investments based on the mercury rule. It remains to be seen how industry and the courts will treat the mercury rule while EPA’s re-review is pending – and what impact, if any, the ruling may have on the Obama EPA’s climate change agenda and other initiatives.

OSHA recently passed new rules requiring employers to notify OSHA of a fatality within eight (8) hours of the death.  The new rules also require employers to file a report with OSHA for each in-patient hospitalization of an employee or situations where an amputation or eye-loss has occurred.  The report must be made within 24 hours of the incident.  OSHA defines in-patient hospitalization as a “formal admission to the in-patient service of a hospital or clinic for care or treatment.”  Employers can make the report in person to the OSHA area office, by a toll-free number, 1-800-321-OSHA, or by electronic submission on OSHA’s website, www.osha.gov.  The reporting obligations apply to all employers, even those that are exempt from OSHA’s recordkeeping requirements.  The new rules will go into effect on January 1, 2015.

As a result of this change, OSHA will likely perform more inspections of establishments where serious injuries or fatalities occur.  As always, it is imperative for employers to be proactive in an effort to minimize unsafe conditions in the workplace.  At the same time, employers need to develop procedures to address serious injuries or fatalities that may occur in their establishment.  To this end, employers should educate their managers and supervisors of OSHA’s new reporting requirements.  By taking these steps, employers can protect their employees and minimize their liability resulting from workplace accidents.

OSHA’s injury and illness recordkeeping regulations, 29 C.F.R. 1904, require that on February 1, 2013 certain employers post a summary of all injuries and illnesses that occurred in 2012.  Employers are required to use OSHA’s 300A summary form or an equivalent form.  The summary must remain posted until April 30, 2013.  Even if there were no recordable incidents in 2012, companies are required to post the 300A summary form.

The summary form must be posted in a place where notices to employees are customarily posted or should be provided to employees who may not see the posted summary because they do not report to a fixed location on a regular basis.  The owner or officer of the company is required to certify the information contained in the OSHA 300A form.

OSHA’ recordkeeping requirements apply to all non-exempt employers.  Excluded from these regulations are companies with ten or fewer employees as well as low hazard industries such as retail, service industries, finance etc.  A full listing of exempt employers as well as OSHA’s recordkeeping forms and instructions can be found at its website, OSHA.

Cole Schotz is pleased to welcome Susan C. Karp as a partner in the Environmental Department.

 

Ms. Karp regularly counsels clients on transactional and regulatory environmental issues relating to the sale and purchase of commercial and industrial properties, the cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated properties and the financial incentive programs available to reduce cleanup costs.

Ms. Karp can be reached at 201-525-6348 or skarp@coleschotz.com.