The Supreme Court on Monday dealt a setback to the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulation limiting mercury and other toxic emissions from power plants – the “mercury rule.” In Michigan v. Environmental Protection Agency, the Court held that EPA acted unreasonably by making its initial decision to regulate plant emissions without considering the cost of regulation.

The New Jersey Tax Court recently ruled in Methode Electronics, Inc. v. Twp. Of Willingboro, Docket Nos. 019012-2010 and 014098-2011 (Tax January 22, 2015) that the assessment on contaminated property located in Willingboro, New Jersey must be reduced to a mere nominal amount due to its undevelopable condition.  In Methode, the property owner

In the case of Litgo v. Martin, 2011 WL 65933 (D.N.J. Jan. 7, 2011) the federal District Court of New Jersey held that a shareholder of a single-purpose entity that owns a contaminated facility is liable as a current operator under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, 42 U.S.C. Sec. 9601 et

Every day, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (“NJDEP”) makes many decisions which disappoint the agency’s varied stakeholders. Individuals are upset with NJDEP land use permitting decisions, either because they prevent planned development or allow development on adjacent properties. Permit applicants are upset with limitations placed upon various wastewater or air emissions discharge permits. 

On March 31, 2008, the United  States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”), under the authority of the federal Toxic Substances Control Act, issued new rules governing home improvement contractors and maintenance companies engaged in the renovation and repair of houses, child‑care facilities and schools constructed before 1978.  The purpose of the rule is to protect