Site Remediation Reform Act

Article originally published in New Jersey Law Journal.

In an effort to expedite the remediation of more than 20,000 contaminated sites, New Jersey passed the Site Remediation and Reform Act (SRRA) on May 7, 2009. SRRA transferred the responsibility of overseeing most cleanups in the state from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP)

Over the next three to four weeks, the NJDEP will be sending letters to the responsible parties for all contaminated properties in New Jersey (other than residential properties) providing the NJDEP’s proposed ranking for each site.  Responsible parties will have only about 60 days to “challenge” those rankings.

The Site Remediation Reform Act, passed in

The Site Remediation Reform Act enacted on May 7, 2009, and codified at N.J.S.A 58:10C-1 et seq. (“SRRA”), its implementing regulations, and amendments to the Technical Requirements for Site Remediation include new requirements in addressing environmental issues that the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (“NJDEP”) deem to be a public health threat and categorize

The Administrative Requirements For Remediation Of Contaminated Sites (“ARRCS”) were promulgated on November 4, 2009. These interim rules were issued pursuant to the Site Remediation Reform Act (“SRRA”) that was passed on May 7, 2009, which changes the way investigation and cleanups are conducted in New Jersey. These interim regulations include significant modifications to the